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Is My TAE40110 Cert IV in Training and Assessment Still Relevant?

Is My TAE40110 Cert IV in Training and Assessment Still Relevant?

In early April 2016 a new Training and Assessment training package was released by training governing body ASQA. TAE40110 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment has been superseded by TAE40116 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment which will now be the industry standard Training and Assessment program.

But what does this mean for those who hold the TAE40110 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment and is your qualification still current?

Yes, it most certainly is, although there are 2 additional units you will need to complete by April 2019 if you don’t already hold these. So there is no need to upgrade to the TAE40116, but in addition to the TAE40110to continue to meet the requirements to be qualified trainer and assessor for VET accredited training you will need to hold:

Either one of the following:

  • TAELLN411  Address adult language, literacy and numeracy skills
  • TAELLN401A Address adult language, literacy and numeracy skills

Plus one of the following:

  • TAEASS502 Design and develop assessment tools
  • TAEASS502A Design and develop assessment tools
  • TAEASS502B Design and develop assessment tools.

(Source: https://www.education.gov.au)

Some trainers and assessors who hold the TAE40110 may have completed one or both of these units as electives or as part of ongoing professional development. Our program has included the LLN unit since 2014 and the required assessment unit since Aug 2016.

How do you know which units were in your program?

You will have received a statement of results or academic transcript that lists the units of competency completed as part of your TAE40110 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.  If you don’t have them, contact the RTO that issued your certificate. If you completed the training with Workplace Dimensions the units will be listed on the reverse side of your certificate.

 I don’t have those two units I need – what do I do?

If you do not currently hold the relevant units, you will need to complete them before 1 April 2019 to meet the new requirements.

Workplace Dimensions currently offers a 1-day program in the TAELLN411 Address Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy skills.

In this interactive one-day program you’ll gain a greater ability to support students throughout their learning journey by introducing you to the core language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) demands of training and assessment. You’ll also learn to tailor training and assessment to suit individual skill levels, including accessing relevant support resources.

We created this program to provide you with this unit while providing you with a forum to ask questions about wider VET/TAE/Training. This environment will give you a forum to work with peers and experts in the training domain and as a trainer and assessor in the VET sector, undertaking this unit contributes to your ongoing professional development which is a requirement under the standards for RTO’s.

 

Find out more our 1-day program in the TAELLN411 Address Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy program dates across Australia, costs and how to book, visit www.workplacedimensions.com.au/lln .

Ducab – When Enhancing Safety Culture Heats Up

Ducab – When Enhancing Safety Culture Heats Up

By Dr Paul Johnston. Lead Consultant and Facilitator

Safety Dimensions recently had an opportunity to expand our relationship with Ducab [the Dubai Cable Company, a leading manufacturer of cabling], assisting them in enhancing their HSE culture via a Behavioural Based Safety [BBS] program. Already OHSAS18001 certified, Ducab’s intention is to exceed mere compliance with the required standards, and to achieve international “best practice”. Safety Dimensions is excited to be working with them on their health and safety journey.

Challenges

The challenges faced by Ducab are both physical and cultural in nature. Physically, the average temperature in summer of 40°C+, is compounded not only by levels of humidity in excess of 60%, but also by the presence of aluminium and copper furnaces on site. Culturally, the workforce is as diverse as the wider Dubai population, with most originating from highly hierarchical societies that are characterised by a significant “power distance” in relationships.

Power distance is a term that describes how people belonging to a specific cultural group view power relationships between people, including the degree to which people not in “power positions” perceive and/or accept that power is spread unequally.

Strengths

Although the cultural backgrounds of Ducab’s workforce do indeed constitute a challenge in establishing, implementing and maintaining an effective BBS program, the same also provide a solid foundation on which to build. Whilst this may seem somewhat paradoxical, although the sense of power distance in significant, so is the importance of “team” and “community” to the workforce – this is the strength that has already contributed to Ducab’s success, and this is the strength on which the roll-out of the BBS program is being based. Indeed the Australian mindset of “looking after your mates” is a reasonable comparison. The main difference, however, is the perceptions associated with hierarchical relationships, and the manner of communication that is associated with it. (Continued below)

The Way forward

In moving forward with Ducab, the intention is to build on their success and cultural strengths, extending their sense of “team” to create a greater sense of “permission” to have safety conversations with others, regardless of rank and title.

Will this be easy?….No.

Is it achievable?….Yes.

One of the key reasons for these answers is what we saw during our 3 weeks with Ducab. During this time, site visits and interviews were conducted, and 3 two day Safety Leadership workshops were facilitated, as was a one day Executive Masterclass. Throughout these activities, two themes remained  constant – the intent to work diligently for the good of the company, and the willingness to have open discussions in what were considered to be appropriate settings. The goal is to extend this so that all of Ducab is seen as an appropriate setting for such interaction. This goal, although challenging, is one that I believe Ducab can achieve – with this being based on the level of commitment and willingness to learn that was witnessed of both management and front-line operators alike during our time there.

Indeed, the current pace of development in Dubai, both in terms of commercial operations and infrastructure development, is remarkable – with this being reflected in the collective willingness to establish long term partnerships and to strive for international best practice.

With this in mind, we are looking forward to our next trip to Dubai, scheduled for early next year, and to see what the future in the region brings.

What Did We Learn ?

From our initial site visits, interviews, the subsequent Masterclass, through collaboration we all learned more about Ducab, the challenges they face and how to move Safety forward in a tangible way.   The experience can best be summarised in the statement “Limitations are what we put in the way, not what are actually there”.  Ducab’s willingness to understand, challenge themselves and to apply a different approach to safety was quite evident, and it something that companies both internationally and locally could learn a lot from.

Our International Advantage

Safety Dimensions has instructionally designed and/or delivered behavioural safety leadership and similar programs in 20 countries.

Read more about our international advantage here : http://www.safetydimensions.com.au/international

To find out how Safety Dimensions can help your organisation transform Safety Culture, no matter where in the world you are, call us on 1300 453 555 in Australia or internationally on +613 9510 0477.

The Safety Journey With Costa Group

The Safety Journey With Costa Group

Costa Group is Australia’s largest horticultural company and a major supplier of produce to food retailers. With over 3,500 hectares of farmed land across Australia and more than 6,000 employees during peak seasonal periods, Costa values their employees and prioritises their safety.

Safety Dimensions has been partnering with Costa Group since 2015 to continue building a strong safety culture, working on building skills and knowledge in the area of safety, for Senior Executives and Frontline Leaders.

Approaches taken included designing and developing a Costa specific Masterclass for Senior Executives, and choosing a two-day Safety Leadership program, refined through a piloting process with key stakeholders and their front-line leaders.

Post pilot, this program was rolled-out nationally to all Leaders and Managers of the business.

The program included Keepad, a surveying technology enabling participants to respond anonymously to a series of safety culture and leadership questions through the use of a handheld device. Questions were specifically developed to enable Costa to collect real-time data about behaviours and perceptions from their workforce. This data was utilised by Costa and Safety Dimensions to analyse and prioritise next steps in the journey.

Drawing together the real-time Keepad data, the positive feedback from the learners, and the improvement in Costa’s safety figures (post the Safety Leadership program) in partnership with Safety Dimensions next steps were implemented to consolidate and continue the safety journey for Costa employees.

Costa and Safety Dimensions has partnered with Costa to launch an online portal to enabling their staff (who have already undertaken the initial programs) to refresh and embed the learning from the 2-day Safety Leadership program. Safety Dimensions has built customised online portals to enable learners to do pre-work or surveys before program, or as a tool to embed the learning after programs have completed.

Within the online portal, the initial Keepad questions have been included, and this will enable Costa and Safety Dimensions to analyse shift from their earlier data in safety behaviours and perceptions over time and gain further actionable insights.

Safety Dimensions spoke to Lou Torcaso, WHS and Workers Compensation Manager at Costa about their safety journey.

Prior to this safety journey what where some of the challenges Costa experienced that you think are common to others in industry?

A challenge prior to our safety journey was providing leadership to employees on how we think about safety. There was inconsistency in a standard message across all Costa Group (business is made up of 5 different units). Some sites were more advanced than others and the challenge was to create a level playing ground across all Costa sites.

Pre this safety journey another challenge was getting the buy-in from key stakeholders about what our safety culture would look like if we implemented a program for change. We needed to ensure that this program wasn’t “just another training course” and instead a program that would help our leaders to use tools to improve how they manage their people and that they’d see the benefits in using these tools.

What were the key outcomes you were looking for when you began this partnership?

To provide the same safety message across all Costa Group sites and ensure the consistency of the training to all employees. The challenge was to be able to do this over 40 sites nationally (with some sites located in regional/remote areas).

We were looking to improve the safety culture of our Managers, Supervisors and Team Leaders to enhance their behaviour and mindset which we hoped in effect would cascade into improvement of our safety performance through proactive control.

The key outcome for all of this was to also ensure this was sustained and not forgotten about in 6 months or that “old habits” returned. We felt we needed strong Facilitators/Trainers to provide the consistent safety message across all sites. These Facilitators/Trainers need to be engaging and influential in communicating the program.

What did you think the biggest obstacles were going to be to the success of this project?

The biggest obstacle for the success of this project was managing the logistics in getting over 600 people nationally (including those in regional areas) trained over a period of time and to manage this from a central point with venues in a number of places across the country. This created another obstacle with travel costs, accommodation etc. The other obstacle was getting support by all business units (WHS Managers) as well as the Executive team.

Another obstacle was time. Trying to not only coordinate people to get to the training, but also provide a program that wasn’t too long and wasn’t too short to be effective. This program required people to take time out of their normal duties so the challenge was to provide a program to cater for the site’s needs. For example some sites participated in two consecutive days of training, whilst others had 1 day training and then their second day was 3 weeks later. Flexibility was important for the success of this project.

Safety can be viewed as time consuming and costly, how within the partnership did you to stay within your time-frames and budgets?

Prior to approval we conducted a “snapshot” 5 hour version of the 2 day program for the Executive team (Masterclass program) as well as a “pilot program” for key stakeholders (WHS Managers). This provided the team the “buy-in” to the program so that they understood what we needed to achieve. This also provided us financial support to roll this out to the broader group.

We worked with Safety Dimensions to create a schedule for the year and mapped out what the costs would be, based on training program, Facilitators/Trainers availability, venues, travel, accommodation etc. Once finalised, this was locked in and people were able to book participants into the program according to the dates that worked with them (via an online booking system developed by Safety Dimensions).

Centralising venues across each state allowed for efficiency and reduced costs to get employees to the program. With support from our company sponsor (Chief Operating Officer) funds were approved and signoff to be included in the budget. This was then tracked regularly by me to ensure that we stayed within budget. The key to this success was to provide key stakeholders reasons as to why this wasn’t a time consuming and costly exercise and we did this by providing them information and involving them with the process.

Often when employees are directed to undertake a program this can be met with mixed reactions. Did employees shift their views during this journey?

From the day our first program commenced employees reactions were very positive overall. Whilst there were a small percentage of negative reactions, we felt that overall the mindset had shifted and this had reflected in significant improvements to our safety performance.

There is supporting evidence that would suggest that the significant increase in Near Miss reporting correlates to when the program had commenced. Feedback from some sites showed significant increase in reporting. In theory reporting near misses effectively reduces LTI’s, MTI’s and FTI’s. This theory is further supported with the Total Recordable Frequency Rate (TRFIR) trending downwards since the roll out of this program.

This in effect clearly showed our senior management the benefits of this program.

Do you have any positive stories or anecdotes about how this training impacted a particular worker or business unit’s way of operating or thinking when it comes to safety or leadership?

Keepad survey data indicated that we are moving in the right direction and that we are not that far away in where we need to be. Whilst there are some sites better than others in implementing proactive safety, there was a general consensus that people are not afraid to speak to their managers around safety and that employees were confident that there was a commitment from senior management.

One positive that comes to mind was a particular Manager at one site had called me the very next day after he had completed his training to tell me that he had “seen the light” and that it made sense to him now in what he needs to do to change the mindset of his team. Within that week that particular site had implemented a number of improvements in both process and procedures. This was further reflected on a number of initiatives implemented that eventually gave this site an internal award (Chairman’s Award) for “Workplace Health and Safety” for demonstrating improvement.

How important is it to partner with the right training provider?

An excellent relationship is really critical to partnering with the right training provider. We had carefully selected a training provider who needed to be consistent, and most importantly be flexible with our needs.

It was important that we were able to select Facilitators/Trainers who we felt comfortable with (pre-selection of trainers prior to the commencement of program) and to be able to communicate with our provider around better ways to coordinate the training to suit our needs.



Thanks to Lou Torcaso for speaking with us. Find out more about the Costa Group here.


Ready to transform your organisations safety culture?

Like to speak to Safety Dimensions about your safety journey?

Contact us now on 1300 453 555 or use our contact form here.

The Alarming Cost Of Stress

The Alarming Cost Of Stress

Safe Work Australia reports that the costs of mental stress-related claims in Australia is more than $10 billion per year. And it is estimated that the effects of stress on those who are at work but not performing to their potential costs Australian businesses a further $34 billion a year. While we recognise that stress comes in many forms, sometimes positive and useful for peak performance, and sometimes counterproductive, we need to be far more proficient at channeling the positive stress and significantly reducing the cost of disruptive stress.

One of the key reasons for the alarming cost of stress-based lost time and claims payout is that many managers feel ill equipped to have conversations that they perceive as an “invasion of another’s personal space”. When early symptoms of stress become evident in the workplace they may be left unchecked because a manager or colleagues may struggle with how to sensitively raise the subject, may feel awkward crossing the work/personal boundary, or fear triggering a defensive response or creating an even stronger reaction. So, many just avoid starting a conversation and hope the individual will employ their own coping mechanisms.

Symptoms of stress can be physiological, behavioural, cognitive or emotional and will often manifest in mood swings, headaches, absenteeism, bullying behaviour, presenteeism (being there but ‘not’ there mentally), withdrawal, avoidance and the gradual development of negative toxic culture. Where the stress trigger may be work based, an informed manager can explore the root cause of the stress (potentially a change process) and be better prepared to manage these triggers by dealing with them at the systemic level. And when the stress manifests at work due to personal or non-work-based events, they will still be able to provide necessary support in order to help the individual return to a ‘normal functioning’ state.

So as managers and colleagues, how well equipped do you feel to recognise stress in others in order to step in, provide basic support to help an individual deal with the stress and to help prevent this stress impacting the rest of the team?

Janet McCulloch
Managing Partner, Leadership Dimensions


Safety Dimensions & Leadership Dimensions has a suite of programs focused on dealing with stress in the workplace, managing critical incidents and extreme stress and ‘Emotional First Aid – Conversations With Colleagues That Really Count’. For further details, click here.

Dealing With Stress Programs

Dealing With Stress Programs

stress

Dealing With Stress Programs

Stress comes in many forms, sometimes positive and useful for peak performance and sometimes counterproductive when built up over a period of time.

Stress shows up as higher absenteeism, higher workcover claims, poor performance, bullying behavior, harassment, and a negative toxic culture. Whilst most companies have preventative safety programs, they fail to provide managers with an understanding of what happens to a person when affected by a critical incident or cumulative stress at home or at work and what to do about it.

In this suite we offer three distinctly different, yet complimentary programs.

 

The Daily Grind – A Manager’s role in reducing stress in the workplace

Understand the different types of stress and the physical, emotional and cognitive effects on a person. Discover what successful (and non successful) coping mechanisms can be applied (for yourself and those you lead) and what to do about reactive and cumulative stress at an individual, team and organisational level so it does not negatively impact the person and therefore organisation.

Outside What’s Normal – Managing extreme stress reactions in the workplace – Managing Critical Incidents

We work with many industries with high risk environments, where fatalities and long term injuries may occur. We know if you don’t deal with the physical and emotional issues that result from incidents, your organisation can develop serious systemic cultural issues which impact individuals and the bottom line. In this program discover what individuals, managers and organisations can do after a critical incident in the workplace (or at home). Also called “Emotional First Aid”, discover what physically occurs in your body after a critical incident and equip managers with the tools and understanding of what to do when a team member is affected.

It is not the role of managers to be counsellors, nor are they trained for this, however managers are required to support their team to perform effectively and guide them appropriately.

Peer Support Programs To Successfully Manage Stress

Successfully managing stress in the workplace is a three tiered approach. Organisational and managerial alignment is critical, yet establishing a successful peer support program is fundamental in managing this element of wellbeing. Learn what is involved in establishing a succuessful ‘peer support’ program to manage all types of stress in the workplace and then, should your organisation wish to implement a structured and formal peer support program – we can partner with you to provide specialist consulting and support.


Who would benefit from these programs?

  • Current supervisors, leaders and managers
  • Individuals who experiences workplace stress
  • Concerned colleagues
  • HR, Safety and Wellbeing professionals

To have conversation about  how these suite of programs can help with stress in your organisation, call us on 03 9510 0477 or email us on info@safetydimensions.com.au