Australia Wide 1300 453 555 | International +613 9510 0477 info@safetydimensions.com.au
Leadership Excellence at Downer (LEaD1)

Leadership Excellence at Downer (LEaD1)

Leadership Excellence At Downer (LEaD1)

Find out about our Leadership & Management course

Downer is the leading provider of integrated services in Australia and New Zealand. It works closely with its customers to design, build and sustain assets, infrastructure and facilities. The Group employs approximately 56,000 people across more than 300 sites, primarily in Australia and New Zealand and also in the Asia-Pacific region, South America and Southern Africa.

A long-term client, Downer approached Leadership Dimensions (the leadership division of Learning Dimensions Network)  two years ago with a desire to further support their frontline leaders.

We know that clients who invest significantly in their employees develop competent and confident people who build skills, knowledge and experience within the organisation, often leading to those individuals being promoted. Companies who are adept at identifying this talent are also proficient in setting new managers and leaders up for success. Early on, Downer recognised the importance of investing in its frontline leaders and one of its strategies was to partner with Leadership Dimensions to develop a highly customised, nationally accredited qualification aligned to the BSB42015 Certificate IV in Leadership and Management.

The program is modularised to suit the different business divisions across Downer, all of which have varying requirements around how the training needs to be delivered. For example, employees from remote mining projects will require a different solution to those on working on rail or gas projects.

Two years on, this program – having being delivered to over 280 Downer employees across Australia – has developed a solid reputation for being able to impart the tangible, practical leadership skills needed on the ground.

Candice Mesecke, Executive Manager, Organisational Development & Change at Downer says: “Developing our leaders is key to our overall business performance. Our frontline leaders are responsible for delivering results for our customers in a safe manner, on time and on budget. They lead groups of diverse employees and are therefore key drivers of the business’s success. LEaD1 (our internal name for the program) needed to be dynamic and relevant if it were to create a shift in mindset and improve performance. Downer’s frontline leaders are incredibly astute individuals who work in no-nonsense environments, so we developed a program that aligned to their operating environment and challenges, and was also highly engaging. This has been achieved through clever learning design and outstanding facilitation from the Leadership Dimensions team of approved Downer trainers.”

Broken into themes essential for frontline leaders, the accredited BSB42015 Certificate IV in Leadership and Management face to face delivery components is broken up into four modules:

Leadership Communications – 2 days
Leading Teams – 2 days
Planning, Prioritising and Undertaking Project Work – 2 days
Customer and Stakeholder Management – 2 days

Candice says, “We chose to align the training to the BSB42015 Certificate IV in Leadership and Management so we had a structure for our people to demonstrate solid outcomes. Our people enjoy working towards an accredited qualification and our customers enjoy the benefits of a skilled supervisory workforce. We are proud of the outcomes of the program and the results on the ground, which LEaD1 has managed to generate at Downer within a relatively short time frame.”

With many opportunities in the program to reflect on their attitudes and beliefs, learners say their insights into their own leadership style directly impacts their ability to communicate more effectively, draw on a wider range of leadership skills in challenging situations, and be more mindful about their leadership approach.

One learner said: “I’ve found it really useful to take time away from the work-site to look at the way I lead others, my underlying beliefs, and the way it all comes out in my communication with others. Understanding the concept of “Above the Line” and “Below the Line” behaviours (taking accountability, ownership and responsibility vs blame, excuses and denial) has been really eye opening. I can think of so many examples of times I was leading with “Below the Line” behaviours that just don’t get the best out of people. I can now see how the way I am (as a leader) has a direct impact on the behaviours of those around me and the results we can achieve.”

Thanks to Candice from Downer for speaking to us.


Find out more about Downer


Find out more about BSB42015 Certificate IV in Leadership and Management >>

Want this program customised for your workplace and industry?
Call 1300 453 555 or email info@safetydimensions.com.au

Want to elevate your leadership capacity?

Safety Dimensions offers accredited and non-accredited leadership training for emerging leaders. Through our training, you’ll learn how to effectively communicate, set clear priorities, build team cohesiveness and implement operational plans and continuous improvement.

Want this program customised for your workplace and industry?
Call 1300 453 555 or email info@safetydimensions.com.au

10 Insider Tips to Rock Your Presentations

10 Insider Tips to Rock Your Presentations

From Toolbox Talk To Boardroom Squawk – 10 Insider Tips to Rock Your Presentations

Whether you’re a leader, salesperson or trainer, at some stage most of us need to deliver a presentation at work or do some public speaking.

Great presenting skills help us to influence action, so here are 10 insider tips you can use to rock your presentations.

1. Know your intention.

Before you get started, understand why you’re giving this presentation. Is it to influence action, persuade, report, inspire, educate or a mix? What are the ‘takeaways’ or key messages and ideas you want people to take from your presentation and how do you need to BE to achieve that? Summarise your content into no more than 3 key points so when you plan content, you know what you should include and it’s easier to stay on track. And most importantly what’s your call to action? If you’re not clear, your audience won’t be.

2. Have a plan.

If you fail to plan, you plan to fail. Now you know your intention, plan out your presentation around the takeaway you want the audience to action. When you’re deciding on what content to put into the plan, make sure you have an intro, middle and end that leads people to the key messages within the time allocated. It’s best to know your material from memory when possible but if you’re new to presenting or particularly nervous, keep some notes with you and check them once or twice to build your confidence.   And if you’re not new to presenting, even a couple of minutes planning in your head will make a big difference.

3. Prepare yourself.

The content is only about 10% of the message.  How you present the content creates meaning so make sure you dress right, warm up your voice, take some deep breaths to steady the nerves and feed the brain and be comfortable with how you move around the environment.

4. Practice in front of a buddy, or record yourself.

Even though you may have practiced many times on your own, there’s a sense of clarity which comes from presenting to a buddy or alternatively recording yourself on your phone and listening back. Your presentation might be amazing on paper, but when you hear it out loud it sounds very different. Integrate the feedback and keep practicing.

5. Open with a hook.

When a comedian begins their routine with “So something funny happened to me on the way here tonight”… you are immediately drawn into wanting to know what happened. Start your presentation with something that grabs the attention of the audience, intrigues them and has them open to receive your message. You can start with a question, a wild statistic or story that grabs them and engages them from the very start. Ted Talk presenters are experts at this.

6. Be you and your stories.

There’s nothing more engaging than a person being themselves. Bringing your personality into your presenting style via relevant stories, observations, and shared experiences with the audience helps to make you more relatable, increases trust and builds credibility.  And stories are way more fun than a slow death by PowerPoint.

7. Look at people and engage.

Eye contact is a powerful connector. Make sure you share eye contact around the room.

8. Read the room. Save & Exit

If you’re not into it, your audience will know immediately. If you’re bored, they’re bored. If you feel your topic is particularly dry, do something creative, add some humour or a few well-chosen slides, prop, or pop quiz to ‘break it up’.  And questions engage the brain.  By creating two way communication, you create a conversation and ‘share the load’.

9 Pause and slow down.

Pauses are a great way to bring attention back to you (and to give you a chance to breathe and gather your own thoughts). When you talk about serious issues, for example in a toolbox talk where you are addressing risks and potential danger, near-misses or injuries that have occurred, slow down a bit to give people the opportunity for it to ‘sink in’.

10. Bring it home.

Create a clear path to wrapping up your presentation. Even though you covered them in the body, you want to summarise the headlines of the takeaways to make sure it’s what you leave behind with the audience.

NEW PROGRAM IN PRESENTATION SKILLS!

Want to elevate your presentation, facilitating and training skills?
Our public program division Workplace Dimensions is offering a new program,

“The Art of Training, Presenting and Facilitating”
2 Day Course

2 Day Program Regular Price– $1250
Early Bird until Feb 1st – $950

Group Special – $950 for 3 or more booking together

NEXT DATE:
Tues 27 – Wed 28 Feb, 2018

LOCATION:
COLLINGWOOD MELBOURNE

More dates and locations coming soon.
We can also customise this program for your organisation.

Want to elevate your Toolbox Talks?

Effective Safety Consultation Program

This program focuses on helping participants generate genuine two-way communication.

Get the skills to:

  • Conduct effective and engaging Toolbox Talks, Pre-Start and safety meetings
  • Gain employees’ and team members’ attention and get them motivated about safety
  • Learn how to overcome potential barriers to achieve engaged participation
  • Ensure others don’t just hear, but understand safety messages
  • Show confidence as a communicator and leader
  • Apply effective consultation skills to all meetings

Download the course outline (page 9) in our full course brochure here >>

Low “Near Miss” Reporting – Good Sign or Failure?

Low “Near Miss” Reporting – Good Sign or Failure?

Ready to train your people in hazard identification and risk management?

We have a range of programs that will train your people in hazard identification and risk management which we can tailor specifically to your industry organisational needs.

Training can be taken as individual training program (download our course outlines here), or as part of one of our accredited programs:

10604NAT Certificate IV in Safety Leadership (WHS) – Construction

BSB41415 Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety

BSB51315 Diploma Of Work Health And Safety

Need some training? We can customise to your needs.

A near-miss is defined as an “unplanned event that did not result in injury, illness or damage – but had the potential to do so.”

As organisations move through their safety culture maturity the issue of near-miss reporting raises its head. A mature organisation has a culture which tracks near-misses, examines how and why the near-miss happened, then puts in controls to minimise or eliminate the risk.  However not all organisations understand the purpose of near-miss reporting, or even if they say they do, they may fail to communicate benefits that reporting near-misses can bring to the safety of the organisation.

The purpose of near reporting is to allow the organisation to take cultural clues and assess their processes and procedures to determine how to prevent the “near-miss” occurring again with potential harm associated with it.

Some organisations celebrate low reported numbers of near-misses. However, many do this without closely determining what the low numbers mean? Did the near-misses not happen, or is it more likely that staff are just not reporting them?

Safety professionals agree that implementing a near-miss or close call reporting system works to rectify potential hazards and injuries.

Near-miss reporting is often described as a gift – because it hasn’t caused harm but instead is a wake-up call that something could have gone wrong if adequate controls weren’t put in place.

Near-miss reporting adds value in an organisation when it is treated in a proactive way – used to improve the workplace and move towards rectifying risks. At the same time support needs to be given to those who report the near-miss, and the learning that comes out of the near-miss or close call needs to filter through the whole organisation.

Why don’t people report near-misses?

There are five common reasons why employees / contractors don’t report near-misses or close calls.

  1. The fear of management reprisal. This could be; the fear of losing your job for speaking up, being branded a snitch or implicating others in the cause or the impact of the near-miss. For contractors it could be the fear of loss of reputation, work or an entire contract.
  2. Nothing happens. Near-miss reporting is seen as a ‘tick and flick’ requirement for management. The person reporting the near-miss does not ever hear or see what happens once they have submitted their report.
  3. The paperwork gets in the way. It’s just too much trouble to start up the paper trail which will go nowhere, so why should we all bother creating more work for everyone?
  4. What’s a near-miss and what do I have to report on? The uncertainty of what constitutes a near-miss and of exactly what has to be reported and sometimes even how to report it.
  5. It’s no biggie. The perception that it is ‘just something that happens in the line of work we do’.

10 Steps to encourage near miss reporting

  1. Train people in hazard identification. This has your people thinking proactively about hazards before they escalate into near misses. Safety Dimensions can help you with this.
  2. Remind your leaders and frontline staff that near misses being reported – especially if there have been a few in the past – are opportunities to improve, not slacken the focus on safety systems and procedures.
  3. Look for and share stories of where near miss reporting and rectifications have stopped a major incident or seek out and share near miss reports and how they are being responded to on a daily basis.
  4. Work collaboratively to work out a system to report near misses. i.e. potential for severe harm to people, plant/ assets, environment (high-risk). Keep it simple so everyone knows what to do and how to report.
  5. Make the reporting system easy to use and with the ability to collect useful data for rectification – this might mean you need to develop an anonymous reporting system, using technology i.e. online, an incident hotline, dedicated text message number or a mobile app.
  6. Encourage verbal reporting. You may need to start by doing the paper-work for your team.
  7. Praise whoever submits a near miss report. Let everyone know this is how they can play their part in stopping major incidents based on their reporting, before it happens again. The difference between complacency and speaking up (about a near miss or hazard) can make the difference between no one getting hurt, an injury or a tragic fatality.
  8. ACTUALLY DO SOMETHING. You’ve been given a wake-up call by a near-miss, now use that knowledge of what ‘could have happened’ to put in controls to eliminate or manage the risk immediately.
  9. At the end of each week, month or quarter, review the types of near misses that have occurred, with your team, to highlight trends and patterns to determine coaching / training / reinforcement/ procedure or systems review that your organisation needs to undertake to strengthen the area.
  10. Acknowledge the fact that your team sees near miss reporting as “the way things are done around here” and it’s no longer a tick and flick exercise.

Ready to train your people in hazard identification and risk management?

We have a range of programs that will train your people in hazard identification and risk management which we can tailor specifically to your industry organisational needs.

Training can be taken as individual training program (download all our course outlines here or the individual topics below) as part of one of our accredited programs:

10604NAT Certificate IV in Safety Leadership (WHS) – Construction

BSB41415 Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety

BSB51315 Diploma Of Work Health And Safety

DOWNLOAD COURSE OUTLINE NOW

 Risk Assessment including hazard identification, risk analysis.

This programs helps you identify and describe the difference between a hazard and a risk and introduces a way of thinking about hazard identification and risk management as an everyday activity. Enhances the skills and capabilities of leaders in the areas of hazard identification, risk analysis, and identification and how to implement appropriate risk controls.

DOWNLOAD NOW >>

DOWNLOAD COURSE OUTLINE NOW

Participate In Incident Investigations.

This program gives participants the mindset and skill set to undertake or assist in incident investigations, including how to identify and ensure all evidence and facts related to an incident  (or near-miss) are understood, sequenced and analysed.

Coach others to use best practice safety thinking when investigating near misses, high potential incidents and other critical events.

DOWNLOAD NOW >>

DOWNLOAD COURSE OUTLINE NOW

Manage Incident Investigations.

This program develops your skills to determine the requirements, protocols and processes of managing a post incident response, including leading others to gather evidence effectively, identifying the real causal factors of an incident, corrective and preventative actions and overseeing appropriate reporting, monitoring and reviews.

DOWNLOAD NOW >>

5 Ways to Improve Your Chances of Winning Tenders

5 Ways to Improve Your Chances of Winning Tenders

What does it take to win large pieces of work?

At Safety & Leadership Dimensions, we work closely with companies in their tender process and often get asked to partner on large tenders as part of their winning tender team.

Here’s what we see makes a successful tender bid.

1.Know the evaluation criteria, and write to it.

Don’t just dump your corporate spiel into their template, take time to understand what they want and articulate why your experience, expertise and capabilities make you the best choice. Don’t skip answers. Work out the evaluation criteria, attend the pre briefings and write to what you see/hear. Never underestimate the value of case studies, testimonials, referees and staff bios which demonstrate your best work and, most importantly are relevant.

2. Make sure writing is clear.

No one assessing the tender has the time to read waffle – and that might be a sign to them you don’t really have the expertise you’re claiming. How specifically are you and your organisation going to add value? Make it easy for them to get the answers they need, in the language of the industry you’re pitching to. Ensure there is enough time for proof reading. Never underestimate how quickly your submission can hit the bin due to a typo!

3. Ensure your people are highly trained.

Training in WHS ensures your people have the knowledge to deliver on what you say you can do. WHS training gives construction companies a competitive edge when their people are trained and qualified resulting in fewer injuries, less work cover claims and a high reputation in the industry. Check out our Industry funding for WHS programs.

4. Have a dedicated presentation team.

Develop your best people in to a polished presentation team with the confidence and expertise to nail the presentation once you’re shortlisted. Need to train up your in pitching? Know when to be short, sharp and impactful vs conversational, consultative and free form?
Check out our ‘The Art of Training, Presenting and Facilitating Program’.

5. Innovate and add value.

What else can your team bring to the response over and above what they’ve asked for? How can you gain a competitive advantage by your organisations ability to innovate or add value to what they’ve asked for? What will make you stand out so you are seen as a credible and low risk, yet exciting choice?


If you would like to partner with Safety or Leadership Dimensions to boost your bids, please contact us info@safetydimensions.com.au or call 1300 453 555

Training counts towards Major Projects Skills Guarantee in Vic

In a directive from the Victorian State Government, all of Victoria’s major publicly funded works over $20 million must use local apprentices, trainees or engineering cadets for at least 10% of the project’s total labour hours under the Major Projects Skills Guarantee.

The Victorian Government’s Major Projects Skills Guarantee provides opportunities for Victorian apprentices, trainees and engineering cadets to work on some of Victoria’s biggest building and construction, infrastructure and civil engineering projects.

The purpose of the policy is to create more job opportunities, particularly for young people, and promote a strong and sustained vocational training culture within the Victorian building and construction industry. More than 50 Victorian Government funded projects will be applying the Major Project Skills Guarantee including the Level Crossing Removal Project, Melbourne Metro Rail Project and Westgate Tunnel.

Time spent by Victorian apprentices or Victorian trainees attending off-site course-related education at registered training organisations (RTOs) may be included as contributions towards the 10% requirement.

Key points from the guidelines also state that;

  • The Victorian apprentices, Victorian trainees or engineering cadets that are utilised must reflect the existing occupational profile of the sector workforce, and contractors are to avoid reliance on any one group to achieve compliance where this is outside the industry or sector norm.
  • Contractors are to be encouraged to use Victorian apprentices, Victorian trainees or engineering cadets drawn from groups who are generally under-represented in industry vocational training such as women, and/or who face barriers to vocational training or the workforce more generally, such as indigenous or older apprentices, trainees or cadets or those with a disability.

Source:
Major Projects Skills Guarantee website : https://jobs.vic.gov.au/about-jobs-victoria/major-projects-skills-guarantee
Guidelines: https://jobs.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/118599/9489-DEDJTR-Employment-Programs-Building-Victoria-Building-Skills-Explanatory-Guide.pdf

Training your apprentices, trainees and engineering cadets off-site in a training program counts towards your 10% project contribution. If you would like to explore how our programs can meet this requirement in Victoria, contact us on 1300 453 555 or email info@workplacedimensions.com.au.

Suggested programs:

Work-related traumatic injury fatalities 2016

These annual reports provide details on the number of people who have died in Australia from work-related injuries, including those that occurred while travelling to and from work and bystanders killed as a result of another person’s work activity.

The reports are based on information from a number of sources: workers’ compensation data, coronial information, notified fatalities and the media.

Data is constantly reviewed and estimates may increase as more information comes to hand to identify a death as work-related. Time series information should therefore only be accessed from the latest report.

Source: Safe Work Australia: https://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/collection/work-related-traumatic-injury-fatalities

Download the full report Work-related traumatic injury fatalities 2016.pdf