Australia Wide 1300 453 555 | International +613 9510 0477 info@safetydimensions.com.au
What makes good adult learning?

What makes good adult learning?

We work everyday with large companies with diverse groups of learners and talk a lot about what makes good adult learning. How do you build and facilitate really great learning experiences?

It’s common to have group of learners in our training who work on the frontline who are technically proficient and may have left formal schooling in their mid-teens. They know their jobs well and are considered functional experts, but when they come into a training environment, there are many reasons they may not want to take part.

Firstly, context. They don’t see the value of the training they’ve been asked to attend, especially if it’s not a required technical license. Organisations need to explain to learners why the organisation is undertaking the training, what the training seeks to achieve, why it’s important to have everyone in the organisation on the same page and most importantly give learners the WIIFM – What’s In It For Me – what will that leaner take away that will enrich them?

Coming into a learning environment with pre-conceived ideas of how the training is going to go is not something restricted to frontline workers – we see barriers to coming to the training room in many all levels.

Tertiary educated people often come to training with the idea that everything they needed to know for the work environment was covered in their formal education. Again, they may lack understanding of the context for the training. Alternatively, some are concerned that their shortfalls might be shown up in a certain way during the learning experience. The latter is termed ‘imposter syndrome’ – the fear of being exposed that ´maybe I’m not as brilliant as everyone thinks I am, and I’m going to be found out any second!

As adults we can carry any negative experiences of past education and learning into the training room –a good trainer will move through this with learners. Sitting for a day concerned about being “found out”, anxious that you should be doing something else, or feeling you’re in an environment where you can’t make mistakes because you’re supposed to be the ‘expert’ is not a positive place to learn from, and gets in the way of fully engaging.

As workers, we often work in areas we are comfortable and can exhibit competence and tend to avoid areas we feel exposed for what we don’t know. However the learning environment is different – it’s there to show where there are gaps in knowledge.

So how do good trainers address this?

When we start our training we undertake a learner comfort ‘piece’.  A trainer or facilitator’s responsibility is not only about transferring learning but about building learning comfort for learners.

The learning environment should challenge us to take different perspectives and a great trainer is an expert at creating an environment where people feel safe going beyond their comfort zone. We try to make our training an open space for learners to be okay to talk about it, but often it takes a lot for the learner to do that until we build trust with each other, which is one of our team of trainers strengths.

All our trainers spend the first part of any program engaging all learners in different ways, identifying learner’s styles and addressing any concerns in the room. Our trainers have a lot of experience, great content and interesting ways of connecting with learners across different audiences.

Another aspect that can’t be underestimated is the sense of community that builds when training groups come together and barriers come down as the training progresses. This can be a powerful experience both when groups are cross functional or are teams that work together in the same role every day. The ability of trainers to present ideas, ask curious questions and create a space for learners to explore and question themselves and each other can create a deep understanding and connection between colleagues that can drive change in organisations.

When talking to prospective clients, we are always very clear on our strength in engaging the learners – how well we deliver on effective adult learning.
Great program content is nothing if it’s not delivered well – our trainers are experts at being able to make things very practical, relevant and put the learner front of mind, which also means our trainers have the skills to be able to adapt their approach to what’s happening in the moment.

Could your internal trainers use these skills?

Many organisations undertake internal training or transferring of information on a daily basis –  whether it be group training or one on one transfer of job skill information from one employee to another. For your internal trainers, understanding adult learning and how to create the best environment for people to take in information is important.

We have programs that can assist your employees responsible for training or upskilling others in your organisation to achieve this successfully.

You can support your staff who train others with these programs:

Train the Trainer Program – 2 Days >>

TAELLN411 Address Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy Skills – 1 Day >>

 

Is My TAE40110 Cert IV in Training and Assessment Still Relevant?

Is My TAE40110 Cert IV in Training and Assessment Still Relevant?

In early April 2016 a new Training and Assessment training package was released by training governing body ASQA. TAE40110 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment has been superseded by TAE40116 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment which will now be the industry standard Training and Assessment program.

But what does this mean for those who hold the TAE40110 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment and is your qualification still current?

Yes, it most certainly is, although there are 2 additional units you will need to complete by April 2019 if you don’t already hold these. So there is no need to upgrade to the TAE40116, but in addition to the TAE40110to continue to meet the requirements to be qualified trainer and assessor for VET accredited training you will need to hold:

Either one of the following:

  • TAELLN411  Address adult language, literacy and numeracy skills
  • TAELLN401A Address adult language, literacy and numeracy skills

Plus one of the following:

  • TAEASS502 Design and develop assessment tools
  • TAEASS502A Design and develop assessment tools
  • TAEASS502B Design and develop assessment tools.

(Source: https://www.education.gov.au)

Some trainers and assessors who hold the TAE40110 may have completed one or both of these units as electives or as part of ongoing professional development. Our program has included the LLN unit since 2014 and the required assessment unit since Aug 2016.

How do you know which units were in your program?

You will have received a statement of results or academic transcript that lists the units of competency completed as part of your TAE40110 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.  If you don’t have them, contact the RTO that issued your certificate. If you completed the training with Workplace Dimensions the units will be listed on the reverse side of your certificate.

 I don’t have those two units I need – what do I do?

If you do not currently hold the relevant units, you will need to complete them before 1 April 2019 to meet the new requirements.

Workplace Dimensions currently offers a 1-day program in the TAELLN411 Address Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy skills.

In this interactive one-day program you’ll gain a greater ability to support students throughout their learning journey by introducing you to the core language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) demands of training and assessment. You’ll also learn to tailor training and assessment to suit individual skill levels, including accessing relevant support resources.

We created this program to provide you with this unit while providing you with a forum to ask questions about wider VET/TAE/Training. This environment will give you a forum to work with peers and experts in the training domain and as a trainer and assessor in the VET sector, undertaking this unit contributes to your ongoing professional development which is a requirement under the standards for RTO’s.

 

Find out more our 1-day program in the TAELLN411 Address Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy program dates across Australia, costs and how to book, visit www.workplacedimensions.com.au/lln .