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Why self-paced online training isn’t for everyone – and how LDN do online differently.

Why self-paced online training isn’t for everyone – and how LDN do online differently.

Hasn’t the world changed? In a short period, we now have a ‘new normal’.
For some, this has meant working from home, for others, reduced hours, being stood down, or unfortunately retrenched.

What has become certain is that life is uncertain.

Yet, the need to expand our skills and be more ‘employable’ has never been more critical. If this resonates and you find yourself ‘googling’ online training or qualifications, there are a couple of things to consider.

Not all online training is the same.

Training providers vary in what they consider ‘online’ learning. When researching, find out how the program is delivered and what happens if you get stuck.  Is the program fully self-paced? This may mean you are given a pdf workbook, login to an online portal of content, pre-recorded lessons including videos, materials, quizzes and message boards, then it is up to you to go through the content and complete assessments. Research what live support you get from trainers via email, chat or phone.  Is this included in the price or extra? How quickly will they respond to your questions or give you feedback?

This style of learning works for some. Why? It’s inexpensive (compared to face-to-face training), you can do it at your own pace, (working around family commitments or work) and you can do it from anywhere.

Sounds like #winning – right?

At LDN, we do things differently.

Our online training is delivered in real-time, with a live facilitator interacting with you, just as they would in face-to-face training – all from the comfort of your home or workplace or anywhere else you can get an internet connection. 

 

We know how people learn best, and therefore combine the best of face-to-face training interactively, just delivered via technology to give you the best learning outcome. We use the most compelling aspects of online interactive technology but don’t leave our learners muddling through on their own.

 

How do you know if self-paced online programs will work for you?

Even with the best intentions, do you sometimes find yourself procrastinating, or struggling to find time to juggle all the urgent versus important things each day?  Let’s face it, we’re not all cut out for self-paced learning. The allure of training in your own time, when convenient, is attractive. However self-paced online only, without live sessions requires steely self-discipline, especially if there is no set timetable.  Also, watching a video and reading materials isn’t always the most exciting way to learn, even if you are passionate about the subject. Especially if the only sliver of time you have to yourself is at 3 am on a Wednesday.

These factors are critical contributors to why online training programs have lower completion rates than traditional face-to-face programs, so you should ask yourself, “Am I a self-paced person or can I find a way to make a structured program work?”.

 

With LDN, you learn in real-time. 

For most people, we find sticking to a structure and having physical materials helps them get things done. When you undertake our programs, you’ll turn up at a specific time on a particular day, just like a real face-to-face session. If you can commit to the time, you’ll get through the content.

We will send you the workbook in the mail so you have something actually in front of you before the live training starts.  No reading pages and pages of text off a screen, nothing to print.  We provide everything you need to participate.  You can find out more about how we do this here.

 

Checking for deep understanding

Our live facilitators check for understanding throughout the session. When a question arises during a face-to-face learning session, it’s dealt with in the moment, so you can then continue your learning with that question answered. If you’re learning in a self-paced format, you may be less likely to ask questions to fill in the gaps of your knowledge if it means sending an email, then waiting for a response and may keep going even if you don’t quite ‘get it’. This may later impact how successful you are with your assessments, and more importantly, it creates a gap in your knowledge.

If you’re someone who likes to ask questions as you’re learning, learning in a live interactive format is going to deliver you the best outcome.

 

Doing it on your own doesn’t work for everyone

The solitary nature of some online self-paced programs may suit students who are uncomfortable in a classroom situation. But if you’re a person who learns well in a group and likes to bounce off ideas, self-paced will likely be a little lonely for you. Traditional eLearning is often geared toward ploughing away at the program content with few opportunities for social interaction, apart from writing and responding to threads on message boards.  This doesn’t make a program’ interactive’, and often the best learning happens when participating or listening to an evolving live conversation!

 

With LDN you’ll learn with a live facilitator and a group of other learners.

You’ll get one of our excellent facilitators live on your computer or device from where ever you are. And you’ll learn with others – just like a real training room. You’ll be able to see your facilitator, interact, discuss, join break-out rooms and simulate many of the activities you can do in a ‘real’ training room. This is as close to a live training experience as you can get without physically being in a room together.

 

Completion rates and satisfaction

If you’re looking at self-paced accredited training, ask your provider, “What’s the completion rate of people undertaking their program?”.  This will give you a good idea of how well they support their learners through their learning and assessments.

 

We’ll be there for you.

Our support doesn’t end when the live interactive online sessions do. You have time after the interactive sessions to complete your assessments with our facilitators and support staff available to support you via video chat, phone and email.  Our results demonstrate quality.  The National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NVCER) surveyed graduates of our accredited programs and reported:

  • 97.1% were employed or enrolled in further study after training.
  • 96.8% were satisfied with the overall quality of their training.
  • 93.7% would recommend the training, 96.4% would recommend us as a training provider.
  • 89.3% achieved their main reason for doing the training

 

See the full  NVCER report here.

 

By focusing on the vital component of learning collaboratively, with a real-time facilitator and your peers (yet also supported by online collaboration tools) LDN uses the technology to enhance your learning experience – and that’s what gives our learners the best outcome.

______________________

SOURCES

https://workplacedimensions.com.au/wp-content/uploads/NCVER-Australian-vocational-education-and-training-statistics.pdf
https://www.ncver.edu.au/research-and-statistics/publications/all-publications/online-delivery-of-vet-qualifications

Safety Dimensions offers both accredited and non accredited programs though our LDN-i online platform powered by the Zoom conferencing platform.

Call us on 1300 453 555  or contact us for more info.

Ready to train your people in safety, risk management, hazard identification or subcontractor management?

We have a range of programs to train your people in risk management, hazard identification  and subcontractor management which can be tailored specifically to your industry and organisational needs. Training can be delivered as individual modules or as part of one of our accredited programs.

You can see our full program suite here >> or see some relevant qualifications or units below:

BSB41419 Certificate IV in Work Health & Safety

The BSB41419 Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety is a nationally accredited program that will teach you how to identify hazards in the workplace, assist with responding to incidents, assess and control risk and consult on work health and safety issues. This program is most suited to those in a Safety Officer or Health and Safety Representatives role, or those currently in leadership roles wishing to shift their career into Health and Safety.

Read more about this program >>

Risk Assessment & Hazard Identification

This program helps you identify and describe the difference between a hazard and a risk, and introduces a way of thinking about hazard identification and risk management as an everyday activity.

It will also enhance the skills and capabilities of leaders in the areas of hazard identification, risk analysis and identification and how to implement appropriate risk controls.

Contact us.

 

Subcontractor Management

Learn to effectively manage WHS site risks and performance by learning how to effectively select, manage and monitor the complex and difficult world of subcontractors.  It also covers the WHS obligations regarding subcontractors, stepping through the various stages of effective subcontractor management, including assessing, evaluating safety history, attitude and managing expectations of performance and reporting.

See our 1-day program >>

Want to find out more about how we can customise our programs to your industry and organisation?
Let's talk!
Call us on 1300 453 555, email info@safetydimensions.com.au or use our contact form here.

Contemporary, online, live and interactive training for your teams (LDN-i)

Contemporary, online, live and interactive training for your teams (LDN-i)

The world has changed and so has the way we all do business. Many organisations are now operating with wider geographically-dispersed teams, or have moved to more flexible work arrangements where their workforces are working remotely or under a hybrid model of remote + office.  Bringing people together in a central location for training or meetings may now have some additional expenses. This is where LDN can help. Our belief has always been that location should not be a barrier to receiving an engaging, excellent high-quality education.

Traditionally online training involves video or document-based tuition, is often self-paced and leaves the participant with no opportunity to ask questions or become engaged through involvement and, more importantly, does not flex to individuals’ different learning styles.

Our live and interactive, facilitator-led training (LDN-i) brings your teams together utilising the most up-to-date video conferencing software (Teams/Zoom).

All programs are delivered in real-time, by our highly skilled and engaging facilitators and utilises the full range of adult learning tools including small group discussions (breakout rooms), online polls, role-playing, quizzes and individual and group activities.  Our programs are accessed by learners through their own laptop, computer or iPad and full support is provided to ensure set up and attendance is easy, even for those who do not often use computers.

LDN-i delivery mode enables clients and their teams to capitalise on the convenience, cost-effectiveness and flexibility of upskilling and training from wherever they are located.

We can design and develop programs for your team or customise any of our proven safety or leadership programs.

To view our existing programs click here>>

 


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What makes good adult learning?

What makes good adult learning?

We work everyday with large companies with diverse groups of learners and talk a lot about what makes good adult learning. How do you build and facilitate really great learning experiences?

It’s common to have group of learners in our training who work on the frontline who are technically proficient and may have left formal schooling in their mid-teens. They know their jobs well and are considered functional experts, but when they come into a training environment, there are many reasons they may not want to take part.

Firstly, context. They don’t see the value of the training they’ve been asked to attend, especially if it’s not a required technical license. Organisations need to explain to learners why the organisation is undertaking the training, what the training seeks to achieve, why it’s important to have everyone in the organisation on the same page and most importantly give learners the WIIFM – What’s In It For Me – what will that leaner take away that will enrich them?

Coming into a learning environment with pre-conceived ideas of how the training is going to go is not something restricted to frontline workers – we see barriers to coming to the training room in many all levels.

Tertiary educated people often come to training with the idea that everything they needed to know for the work environment was covered in their formal education. Again, they may lack understanding of the context for the training. Alternatively, some are concerned that their shortfalls might be shown up in a certain way during the learning experience. The latter is termed ‘imposter syndrome’ – the fear of being exposed that ´maybe I’m not as brilliant as everyone thinks I am, and I’m going to be found out any second!

As adults we can carry any negative experiences of past education and learning into the training room –a good trainer will move through this with learners. Sitting for a day concerned about being “found out”, anxious that you should be doing something else, or feeling you’re in an environment where you can’t make mistakes because you’re supposed to be the ‘expert’ is not a positive place to learn from, and gets in the way of fully engaging.

As workers, we often work in areas we are comfortable and can exhibit competence and tend to avoid areas we feel exposed for what we don’t know. However the learning environment is different – it’s there to show where there are gaps in knowledge.

So how do good trainers address this?

When we start our training we undertake a learner comfort ‘piece’.  A trainer or facilitator’s responsibility is not only about transferring learning but about building learning comfort for learners.

The learning environment should challenge us to take different perspectives and a great trainer is an expert at creating an environment where people feel safe going beyond their comfort zone. We try to make our training an open space for learners to be okay to talk about it, but often it takes a lot for the learner to do that until we build trust with each other, which is one of our team of trainers strengths.

All our trainers spend the first part of any program engaging all learners in different ways, identifying learner’s styles and addressing any concerns in the room. Our trainers have a lot of experience, great content and interesting ways of connecting with learners across different audiences.

Another aspect that can’t be underestimated is the sense of community that builds when training groups come together and barriers come down as the training progresses. This can be a powerful experience both when groups are cross functional or are teams that work together in the same role every day. The ability of trainers to present ideas, ask curious questions and create a space for learners to explore and question themselves and each other can create a deep understanding and connection between colleagues that can drive change in organisations.

When talking to prospective clients, we are always very clear on our strength in engaging the learners – how well we deliver on effective adult learning.
Great program content is nothing if it’s not delivered well – our trainers are experts at being able to make things very practical, relevant and put the learner front of mind, which also means our trainers have the skills to be able to adapt their approach to what’s happening in the moment.

Could your internal trainers use these skills?

Many organisations undertake internal training or transferring of information on a daily basis –  whether it be group training or one on one transfer of job skill information from one employee to another. For your internal trainers, understanding adult learning and how to create the best environment for people to take in information is important.

We have programs that can assist your employees responsible for training or upskilling others in your organisation to achieve this successfully.

You can support your staff who train others with this program:

Train the Trainer Program – 2 Days >>