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7 tips for keeping your remote working team safe and engaged

7 tips for keeping your remote working team safe and engaged

What does ‘work’ look like for you and your team in this current situation?

If your team is working remotely, there may be a lack of certainty about when we may all be able to return to work as we knew it, and when we do, what will it be like?  Even over conferencing platforms like Zoom or WebEx, chances are the face-to-face natural social interactions you’d share in the workplace have dramatically diminished over the past few months.

At the same time, there may be a change in domestic dynamics – perhaps both you and your partner are working from home using technology, you may have children still in the home which presents its own challenges. Plus many are on reduced hours and are trying to do more with less time.

As a leader, you also worry about looking after your peoples’ wellbeing, output and results while dealing with your own situation. We all have different levels of resilience, different needs for social interaction, different needs for the amount of feedback and interaction with our leaders.

The effect can be, to say the least, psychologically stressing on everyone.

Yet work needs to go on. How do you do this?

Firstly as a leader, identify what your needs are at this time.
How does being naturally introverted or extroverted impact you in this situation and under what conditions do you do your best work? Are you missing the hum of the office or are you happy working squirrelled away from your remote location?

These factors will likely influence your leadership response and accessibility at this time.

What we do know, however, is that under our obligations under the WHS/OHS Acts, Regulations and Codes of Practice such as Communication and Consultation and Risk Management – leaders in organisations need to demonstrate Duty of Care.

Here are 7 tips for keeping your people safe and engaged while working remotely

1.Ensure your people are safe wherever they are working
Employers’ duties extend to workers who work from home or remotely, and must take steps to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health and safety of their workers.  Comcare has developed a Working From Home Checklist for employers and workers with guidance and measures on how they can meet their respective work health and safety obligations.

Download the Working From Home Checklist here >>.

2. Give people space
Acknowledge that work is different in many aspects when working remotely. This is the time to assess people on their output, not the clock, and short of installing surveillance cameras in everyone’s home, leaders have to trust people. A study from the Society for Human Resource Management found 77% of workers reported greater productivity while working offsite; 30% said they accomplished more in less time and 24 % said they accomplished more in the same amount of time.

Encourage your people to use outdoor spaces where possible when they take breaks from their computer and try to incorporate some exercise or other activity as part of their working day.

Trust people to do the right things, even though their days might be a mash-up of stop-start-stop-start-stop-stop-start, most people are bending over backwards to do a great job from home.

3.Create community – The Virtual Water Cooler
Create an open room in an online meeting tool like Zoom, WebEX, Skype or Microsoft Teams, and give your team the meeting code so they can join from wherever they are.
Set a time in the workday that works for everyone, say a morning coffee break, afternoon tea or end of the week “wine time” (or “whine time”) where people drop into the online meeting and can see each other and talk about non-work related things. Being able to see one another makes a difference. This is not a work meeting, it’s an essential mental health break.

4. Communicate and tell it straight
Create a weekly “News from the Trenches” via email, video or Facebook live (to a private group of your people, if it’s appropriate for your workplace) –– that outlines how the organisation is going – any initiatives, new clients/opportunities – feedback from clients and customers – how many sales made etc. Be straight, but positive where you can. Anything that reinforces that the business is making headway. A lot of people are terrified about losing their jobs or businesses closing down for good. If you can, reassure them of the steps the business is taking, what government assistance your business is utilising to keep them employed and the business operating, as well as future plans. Knowing is better than the fear of the unknown.

5. Reach out personally
As a leader, call your people regularly and ask “How are you going?”, “What can I/the business do to support you?”, “Do you have the resources to do your job remotely?” and check-in on their wellbeing. Keep them up to date with anything impacting their specific role or responsibilities and ask for ways that you can collaborate to further improve the remote working scenario.
If someone is struggling who is usually a great performer, reach out and ask them how they’re doing and seek to understand where they are at – is it a resourcing issue? The business landscape? Are the complexities of their specific role challenging to do remotely? Is it stress from the dynamics at home? Complete exhaustion? The key is to also listen and acknowledge rather than just talking.

6. Acknowledge people
Most team members thrive on positive feedback, acknowledge them for what they’ve done well either publically or personally and let them know their hard work under the current working conditions hasn’t gone unnoticed.

7. Turn fears into ideas – innovate
While some industries and business are being disrupted and decimated by the pandemic response, others are innovating their way to survival. Ask your team if they see any opportunities to innovate – has the current situation created any opportunities to offer new products, in new ways into new channels or to innovate with processes? Ask if people have any suggestions or can see any new opportunities – how can you turn fears into ideas? Your people are some of the best resources you’ll have for coming up with business innovation and this may be a new opportunity to thrive, both as a business and as an engaged remote team.

Research source: Society for Human Resource Management 
https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/technology/pages/teleworkers-more-productive-even-when-sick.aspx


Want to train your staff at home or remotely?
LDN Interactive (LDN-i) – helping organisations train and develop staff while isolated

Leadership Dimensions, Safety Dimensions and Workplace Dimensions programs are now available through a facilitator-led, real-time, interactive training environment – via computer.

We don’t offer pre-recorded online programs – just the same experience of our face-to-face programs, delivered differently.

Find out more >>

Train your staff at home with LDN Interactive (LDN-i) – helping organisations train and develop staff while isolated

Train your staff at home with LDN Interactive (LDN-i) – helping organisations train and develop staff while isolated

Safety Dimensions, Leadership Dimensions & Workplace Dimensions programs are now available through a facilitator-led, real-time, interactive training environment – via computer.

We don’t offer pre-recorded online programs – just the same experience of our face-to-face programs, delivered differently.

As COVID-19 isolation measures come into play around the nation, many businesses are preparing to have their workforces work from home, where their roles permit.

Even though business-as-usual is interrupted, we can help organisations add significant value to their workforce while they are working at home. Using our LDN interactive platform (LDN-i), you can train and upskill your workforce with real-time interactive, cloud-based training via computer in any of our Safety Dimensions, Leadership Dimensions or Workplace Dimensions programs.

This includes programs in safety leadership, risk management, hazard reduction, leadership, building relationships, managing subcontractors; or any of the programs in our suite of accredited and non-accredited safety or leadership programs.

LDN-i is based on the video conferencing platform Zoom and brings your team together remotely to learn in real-time. Led by one of our skilled facilitators, the platform simulates face-to-face workshop experiences such as, interacting with those in the virtual ‘room’, asking questions, using discovery learning, conducting breakout activities, sharing ideas, using polls, having conversations and role playing new skills and knowledge.


 

 

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What are the benefits of training with the LDN-i interactive platform while your people are working at home?

  • You can leverage the interruption in business-as-usual to upskill your people in a wide range of safety and leadership programs, customised to your organisational needs.
  • Your business can provide professional development for your people and you can choose from non-accredited courses or nationally recognised accredited qualifications.
  • The platform creates a sense of community and connection and your people will be able to see and interact with each other while working from home.
  • It helps your team manage their wellbeing by giving their day structure, allowing them to interactively work together and see and work with colleagues, even though isolated at home.
  • LDN can report on attendance and engagement in the same way we do in face-to-face programs.

 

 

 

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We don’t offer pre-recorded workshops, all our training is live, real-time facilitator-led engagement with participants, customised for your organisational needs and delivered in an interactive online environment.

Our instructional designers work with your organisation to design a program that meets your organisational needs, then deliver it to your workforce live from our three new permanent interactive training technology rooms at our Head Office, with more locations around Australia to come.

We utilise the Zoom interactive conferencing software, which is available cross-platform – either in a web browser or as a downloadable app for desktops or devices. Alternatively, it can be integrated into your intranet. The software is free for your users and uses an Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) 256-bit algorithm to keep everyone’s data safe.

To participate, participants are only required to be connected to the internet via desktop computer or a tablet device with a camera, mic and headphones. If your participant group doesn’t have access to hardware, LDN can provide tablets and headphones. We look after all the logistics and materials.

 

The LDN-i solution is the same great learning experience of our face-to-face training, just delivered differently.

What our participants say about our live, interactive online LDN-i programs

“If you haven’t done it, this is the course to do. The quality of information learnt and the group discussions alone are priceless. My confidence has lifted through the knowledge I have gained from doing this course with Kevin. It’ll be the best thing you’ve done in a long while.”

“Absolutely awesome way of learning.
Don’t knock it till you try it.”

I think it’s an excellent way of learning. I feel more engaged when I do it from home rather than doing it at the workplace.

“If you’re considering the program – do it, you will learn stuff you didn’t think about learning.

A great innovative experience.

“Where would I start? Beginning with the legislation to reticular activity system, attitude-behaviour-consequences, ILEAD, SMART are some of the tools, guides and other techniques I have learnt doing the course that I will utilise in my workplace.

The whole program was fantastic, thank you Kevin and the Workplace Dimensions team.”

“Kevin thank you for giving me an insight into a whole new industry and for sharing your unlimited knowledge and resources with us as a group. I have learnt a great deal about work health and safety and endeavour to improve on my safety knowledge and lead by example in my workplace and home.”

“I think learning via ZOOM was very effective.
I felt I was able to interact with the group as well as I would have in person.”

The facilitator did a great job at delivering the course material, the training was engaging and interesting.
The public speaking aspect of face to face training while learning new skills/topics can bring about some anxiety for me and the online forum eliminated this.”

“Learning via computer was brilliant, I was really pleased. Best type of learning I’ve done.
Our company should do more safety courses online like this one.”

“Absolutely worthwhile. Couldn’t have asked for a better facilitator than Kevin.
Incredibly knowledgeable and knows how o get the best out of each participant in the class”

“Really good. Encourages people to talk in turn rather than on top of each other.”

Are you an existing LDN client?

For our clients who are continuing to run face-to-face training, you can read our COVID-19 response for information on the additional precautions we are implementing to keep learners and facilitators safe while learning together. We work in partnership with your organisational policies to ensure the safety of everyone as our number one priority while also mindful that the situation is ever-changing.

If your workforce is mandating working from home, what your options?

If your organisation is mandating work from home, we have the capacity to continue to deliver programs to your organisation, delivered straight to your staff while they are isolated through our interactive LDN-i interactive, facilitator-led live training, delivered via computer.

They will still be able to interact with those in the virtual ‘room’, ask questions, use discovery learning, utilise flipcharts, conduct breakout activities, share ideas, have conversations and role-play new skills and knowledge.

Our solution is the same great learning experience, just delivered differently.

What technical set up do you need to make this happen?

The Zoom software only requires an internet connection and works cross-platform on all PC and Mac desktop computers, devices and smartphones that have a camera and microphone, which most devices already have.

The Zoom software platform is free for users, and is available either in-browser (through Chrome, Firefox etc.), as a downloadable app for computers and devices, or can be integrated by IT teams into your company intranet. You can select either of these options or have multiple points of access and your people will still be able to participate.

How do people log on to a program and how do organisations know they’ve attended?

Our project management team provide your participants with secure logins, just for your specific training session. We can also report on attendance and engagement in the same way we do in face-to-face programs.

How secure is this?

Zoom also encrypts all content at the application layer using the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) 256-bit algorithm, so the contents of your training are secure.

What if my people aren’t used to using technology this way?
We have implemented technical help resources to seamlessly support participants not familiar with working with this form of technology. If your participant group doesn’t have access to the hardware, tablets can be provided.

How about workbooks and assessments?

We can still supply workbooks, handouts and assessments via post to your workforce and they can return assessments to us electronically for accredited programs. LDN will look after logistics in the same meticulous way we do with our face-to-face programs.

 

How can you get started?
For more information, or to discuss your options, please email your LDN client contact or call our Head Office on 03 9510 0477.

 

NOTE:
The BSB41415 Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety is being superseded by BSB41419 Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety.

Contact us to express your interest and we'll let you know when we have dates for the new program.

Gain your qualification in Work Health & Safety in a live online environment, via computer or device

Our BSB41415 Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety program is now available through a facilitator-led, real-time, interactive training environment – via an internet connected computer or device.

This could be the right time to add value to your role while working at home or from the workplace.

This is not a pre-recorded online program – it is the same experience as our face-to-face programs, delivered by our public programs division Workplace Dimensions.

 

FOR ALL INDUSTRIES

 

 

More from our blog

Leading through uncertain times – how to be a leader through the COVID-19 response

Leading through uncertain times – how to be a leader through the COVID-19 response

How can leaders make things feel as normal as possible to support ‘business as usual’ when we’re certainly not in a ‘business as usual’ environment?

 

So here we are at the beginning of a seismic disruption to workplaces all around the world with the COVID-19 response. Organisations are shifting the way they’re doing businesses, some are closing temporarily, others are mandating their people to work from home, and some are doing both.

This is a challenge for leaders. How can leaders make things feel as normal as possible to support ‘business as usual’ when we’re certainly not in a ‘business as usual’ environment?

The US military coined the acronym ‘VUCA’ to describe times of rapid and unpredictable change that are Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous. VUCA can be used to explore the challenges surrounding the COVID-19 landscape and can double as a simple catch all summary for “Everything is going completely NUTS out there!”

It can also serve as a very useful frame for how leaders should and should not respond at this time as leaders can often display the VUCA characteristics in their own leadership style. This is even more detrimental in the current landscape.

Mertz (2014) gives leaders some tips on leading through VUCA times through the acronym DURT – being Direct, Understandable, Reliable and Trustworthy.

How you can apply this in a COVID-19 response environment :

Be Direct – Give your people the facts. What does the current situation mean for your business and the work your people are doing? How can you do this with kindness and compassion?

Be Understandable – Create a clear context and give clear messaging. Break down messages for your workforce in terms of what your plans mean for them in their role. If you have people in your organisation with English as a second language, or with literacy challenges, make sure your communications are delivered in formats and language that can be understood by them. Consider all communication formats, don’t just rely on email. Try WhatsApp groups, or communicate through video messages for more personalised communication.

Be Reliable – Ensure people can count on you. Workforces are looking at their leaders for direction and reassurance. Do what you said you’d do, or be straight about why the situation has had to change.

Be Trustworthy – No leader, politician or health care professional has a crystal ball to see the future and what the impact of COVID-19 will be. As much as we all crave certainty, acknowledge that situations are changing daily and be straight and compassionate.

Also, leaders need to look out for their wellbeing and that of their people. This can be challenging when we are feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 response, not just at work, but at home and in the wider community. So, don’t forget to be kind to yourself, and others.

REFERENCES:

VUCA Times Call for DURT Leaders

https://www.thindifference.com/2014/05/vuca-times-call-durt-leaders/

Additional information for employers

Here’s some additional information from Safe Work Australia on when employers can direct employees to stay away from their usual workplace under workplace health and safety laws.

Safe Work Australia has information about when an employer can direct employees to stay away from their usual workplace under the model workplace health and safety laws.

More information:

Want to elevate your leadership capacity?

Safety Dimensions offers accredited and non-accredited leadership training for emerging leaders. Through our training, you’ll learn how to effectively communicate, set clear priorities, build team cohesiveness and implement operational plans and continuous improvement.

Want this program customised for your workplace and industry?
Call 1300 453 555 or email info@safetydimensions.com.au

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Which industries have the highest rates of work-related harassment and bullying claims?

Which industries have the highest rates of work-related harassment and bullying claims?

On February 28, 2020, Safe Work Australia released the 2019 ‘Psychosocial health and safety and bullying in Australian workplaces’ annual statement.

Psychosocial health is the physical, mental and social state of a person. The nationally accepted definition of workplace bullying is the ‘repeated and unreasonable behaviour directed towards a worker or a group of workers that creates a risk to health and safety’ (Fair Work Act 2009, s.789FD(1).

Workplace bullying occurs when:

  • An individual or group of individuals repeatedly behaves unreasonably towards a worker or a group of workers at work,
    and
  • The behaviour creates a risk to health and safety.

The following behaviours could also be considered as bullying, based on cases heard:

  • Aggressive and intimidating conduct.
  • Belittling or humiliating comments.
  • Victimisation.
  • Spreading malicious rumours.
  • Practical jokes or initiation.
  • Exclusion from work-related events, and
  • Unreasonable work expectations.

Reasonable management action conducted in a reasonable manner does not constitute workplace bullying.

This report presents the statistics of workers compensation claims when the work-related injury or disease resulted from the person experiencing mental stress or being exposed to mentally stressful situations. The report excludes assault cases where the physical injuries were considered more serious than the mental stress involved in the incident.

The mental stress claims data includes a sub-category for work-related harassment and/or workplace bullying. This sub-category is given to claims when the employee was a victim of:

  • Repetitive assault and/or threatened assault by a work colleague or colleagues, or
  • Repetitive verbal harassment, threats, and abuse from a work colleague or colleagues.

This is the fifth annual national statement issued by Safe Work Australia.

Note: Data presented for mental stress are national figures but data for subcategories of mental stress exclude Victoria because Victorian data is not coded to that level of detail.

Key statistics in the report

 

Rates for both mental stress and harassment and/or bullying claims have risen over the last two years but they are less than the peak in 2010–11. Jurisdictional legislation is highly likely to have influenced the scope of claims involving mental stress over the reporting period.
 

Figure 1. Number, time lost, direct cost, frequency rate and incidence rate for mental stress claims, 2016–17

*Victoria only provides data on the top-level category of mental stress claims, so is included in the total but not the breakdown of sub‑categories. As a result, figures for the total mental stress claims may not equal the sum of columns.

**The Other harassment sub-category includes victims of sexual or racial harassment by a person or persons including work colleague/s.

Notes:

  1. The mechanism of incident classification identifies the overall action, exposure or event that best describes the circumstances that resulted in the most serious injury or disease.
  2. In previous statements, the amount of median compensation paid were calculated after excluding ‘zero dollar’ claims. In this report, all serious claims (including ‘zero dollar’ claims) have been included in calculations.

 

 Claims for harassment and/or bullying made by female employees were more than twice as high as the rate of these claims made by males over the three years 2015–16 to 2017–18 combined. Similarly, the rates for claims made by females relating to work pressure and exposure to workplace or occupational violence were more than twice that of similar claims made by males.

 

Figure 2. Frequency rates by sex and mental stress sub-category, 2015–16 to 2017–18p combined

 

Note: Data presented for mental stress are national figures but data for subcategories of mental stress exclude Victoria because its data are not coded to that level of detail.


 Occupations with a high risk of exposure to work-related harassment and/or workplace bullying include:

  • Other miscellaneous and administrative workers*(includes coding clerks, production assistants, proof readers, radio dispatchers & examination supervisors.
  • Other clerical and office support workers group** includes classified advertising clerks, meter readers & parking inspectors.
  • Other miscellaneous labourers.

Figure 3. Top 10 occupations with the highest frequency rates of work-related harassment and/or bullying, 2015–16 to 2017–18 combined.

*** Police in Western Australian are covered by a separate workers’ compensation scheme and not included in the data.

Notes:

  1. Industries are limited to those associated with more than 50 claims.
  2. Data presented for mental stress are national figures but data for subcategories of mental stress exclude Victoria because its data are not coded to that level of detail.

Industry groups with high rates of claims involving work-related harassment and/or workplace bullying include Public order and safety services; Civic, Professional and other interest group services; and Residential care services.

 

4. Top 10 industry groups with the highest frequency rates of work-related harassment and/or bullying, 2015–16 to 2017–18 combined

 

* Police in Western Australian are covered by a separate workers’ compensation scheme and not included in the data.

Notes:

  1. Industries are limited to those associated with more than 50 claims.
  2. Data presented for mental stress are national figures but data for subcategories of mental stress exclude Victoria because its data are not coded to that level of detail.

Want to elevate your leadership capacity?

Safety Dimensions offers accredited and non-accredited leadership training for emerging leaders. Through our training, you’ll learn how to effectively communicate, set clear priorities, build team cohesiveness and implement operational plans and continuous improvement.

Want this program customised for your workplace and industry?
Call 1300 453 555 or email info@safetydimensions.com.au

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What happens in an unsafe work environment? (Video)

What happens in an unsafe work environment? (Video)

In this brief video, Simon Sinek looks at what a psychologically safe work environment looks like and what happens to people when we don’t create a safe place at work. People need to feel safe enough to share their honest feelings with the confidence that their bosses or colleagues will rush to support them – not judge or fire them.

See the full interview on Impact Theory here.

Want to elevate your leadership capacity?

Safety Dimensions offers accredited and non-accredited leadership training for emerging leaders. Through our training, you’ll learn how to effectively communicate, set clear priorities, build team cohesiveness and implement operational plans and continuous improvement.

Want this program customised for your workplace and industry?
Call 1300 453 555 or email info@safetydimensions.com.au

From our blog

WHS Learner Profile – Kevin Walker

WHS Learner Profile – Kevin Walker

Kevin Walker recently undertook the  BSB41415 Certificate IV in Work Health and Safety, a nationally recognised qualification which trained him to identify hazards in the workplace, assist with responding to incidents, assess and control risk, and consult on work...

read more