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3 industries responsible for 72% of fatalities says interim report

3 industries responsible for 72% of fatalities says interim report

ARCHIVAL ARTICLE FEB 26 2019. The most current data is available here >>

In 2018, the preliminary data showed 154 Australian workers were killed at work, a reduction compared with 190 workers in 2017.

Why does it take so long to get data on fatalities? 2018 figures are preliminary figures and are updated only once the appropriate authorities have investigated the deaths and more accurate information becomes available. Only then does Safe Work Australia include the incident in their statistics.

But what we do know, from most recent validated statistics is that the vast majority (72%) of fatalities occur in 3 industries.

Transport, postal and warehousing (54 fatalities) accounted for more than a quarter of fatalities in 2017 (28%), followed closely by Agriculture, forestry and fishing (52 fatalities, 27%) and Construction (30 fatalities, 16%).

While some industries and professions are inherently more dangerous than others, every organisation can work to do more to promote better safety behaviours.

80% of accidents or incidents are caused by unsafe acts, with only 20% of accidents or incidents being caused by unsafe conditions (Hollnagel 1993, Reason 1990). This means organisations can be doing more to get all levels of their people – leadership, the safety team and employees – on board with a clear vision for their safety culture.

Why get all levels of an organisation on board?

Leaders : We understand that workers’ behaviour is greatly influenced by their immediate supervisor. The standard a leader walks by is the standard workers will meet. Fancy mission statements and commitments don’t make a difference if leaders aren’t ‘walking the talk’ and engaging hearts and minds.

Safety Teams: As organisations mature, the expectations of their safety teams rise. Safety professionals need the capability to become trusted advisors to those managers and leaders who hold the accountability for a safe workplace.

Employees: Employee contribution to the vision of a safe workplace requires a clear and unambiguous message – to speak up and get involved. Equipping your workforce with skills to effectively communicate and address at-risk behaviour among their peers – while still maintaining relationships – is vital to cut through the barrier of silence and a “she’ll be right mate” attitude that permeates some workplaces.

Safety Dimensions offer programs that engage the hearts and minds of each level with the outcome of stronger safety culture and behaviour across the whole organisation.

For leaders, our Safety Leadership Foundation program develops the core level of knowledge required for leaders who need to take accountability and responsibility for healthy and safe culture and behaviours in the workplace. At the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Engage the hearts and minds moving beyond compliance to personal ownership and accountability of safety at work
  • Demonstrate improved skills in conducting effective safety conversations
  • Understand and more effectively manage the drivers of at-risk behaviours
  • Demonstrate increased capability in identifying and managing hazards and risks in the workplace

Focusing on shifting individual attitudes and mindsets regarding how safety is viewed in the workplace, this program also teaches new skills and knowledge to embed behaviour change at an individual and organisational level.

All Safety Dimensions programs are tailored to fit your organisation’s specific way of working. We start where you are in terms of safety maturity, tailoring training and development programs specifically to your organisation. This makes our programs relevant and applicable – the more relevant the program for your people, the easier it is to implement into your culture, resulting in tangible, measurable behaviour change.

Find out more by downloading the Safety Leadership Foundation Program course outline or call us on 1300 453 555.


Sources:
https://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/statistics-and-research/statistics/fatalities/fatality-statistics#year-to-date-2019-preliminary-worker 
https://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/collection/work-related-traumatic-injury-fatalities

Learn More About Our Foundational Safety Leadership Program

Focusing on shifting individual attitudes and mindsets regarding how safety is viewed in the workplace, this program also teaches new skills and knowledge to embed behaviour change at an individual and organisational level.

To find out how we can customise this program for your needs call us on 1300 453 555.

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How to nail your goals

How to nail your goals

Are you left with a bundle of New Year’s resolutions which sounded like a good idea at the time, but never made it past the idea stage? Here are six hacks to revive those goals. 1. Know what you want and get SMART about it Goals work best if they have...

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How to nail your goals

How to nail your goals

Are you left with a bundle of New Year’s resolutions which sounded like a good idea at the time, but never made it past the idea stage?

Here are six hacks to revive those goals.

1. Know what you want and get SMART about it

Goals work best if they have broader purpose and a way to measure their success.

This works best in two parts. First establish the overarching WHY of your chosen goal. Ask, why is that goal important to you? Keep asking ‘why’ till you find a context that inspires you.  If you’re looking find a new job, perhaps your ‘why’ is to ‘do challenging work that uses my skills and expands my boundaries’.

Similarly a goal to lose 5kg might be more inspiring to have the ‘why’ of improved health, vitality and wellbeing.

Once you’ve got your overarching ‘why’, make sure your goals are SMART: SpecificMeasurableActionableReinforcingTrackable.

2. Find an ally

If you want to make your goal stick, share it with someone who’s willing to keep you in check. Tell them why the goal is important to you and ask them to remind you if you go off track. Tapping into groups that have like-minded people, or connecting with someone else who shares the same goal (or has already achieved it) can motivate you to stay on track.

3. Line your ducks up

Whether it’s a personal or professional goal, make sure you have your resources ready to deploy. Planning to run a marathon won’t turn out so well without a training plan and shoes that will go the distance. Ask, do you need to pace yourself, or is it a sprint? Know what you need to do (actions), have (resources) and be (personal attributes) to meet your goal.

4. Set micro-goals

Break down your overarching goals into bite sized micro-goals with milestones and diarise all the tasks you’ll need to complete to keep you on track.

5. Plan for a breakdown

It’s almost certain that something will come up that puts achieving your goal at risk. Life will get in your way, or maybe you’ll get in your own way. How you handle the obstacles and breakdowns will dictate your success or failure. Plan out what action you’re going to take when these breakdowns happen.

6. Celebrate the wins

Not all goals happen overnight, so it’s important to celebrate the small wins along the way to keep you motivated and to acknowledge how far you’ve come.

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How to nail your goals

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Are you left with a bundle of New Year’s resolutions which sounded like a good idea at the time, but never made it past the idea stage? Here are six hacks to revive those goals. 1. Know what you want and get SMART about it Goals work best if they have...

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Engaging Hearts & Minds the key to changing safety behaviour.

Engaging Hearts & Minds the key to changing safety behaviour.

Not getting improvements in your safety leadership culture, or safety statistics? 

It’s highly likely your organisation has failed to engage your people at the ‘hearts and minds’ level required to create and sustain a strong safety culture.

Research shows unsafe acts (behaviours) contribute to 80% of accidents or incidents, whilst unsafe conditions contribute to 20% of accidents or incidents (Hollnagel 1993, Reason 1990). 

Frighteningly, this shows that people’s behaviours are more responsible for accidents than are unsafe environments. The statistics highlight that organisations can have the most stringent safety processes and procedures in the world, yet still have a high incident rate through a failure to engage workers’ values, beliefs, mindsets and attitudes – the keys to changing behaviour.

With a strong demand from organisations in Australia and the UAE, Safety Dimensions has developed a two-day ‘Engaging Hearts and Minds – Creating And Sustaining A Strong Safety Culture’ program, which blends two safety approaches:

1. Engaging the mind through Behavioural Based Safety (BBS) focused on changing behaviour by understanding the mechanics behind our behaviour and;

2. Engaging the heart through Values Based Safety (VBS) which focuses on what drives behaviour at a deep internal level by aligning safety with the values and beliefs of the individual.

 When blended together, Safety Dimensions’ approach captures the hearts and minds of a workforce to ensure sustainable behaviour change is achieved over time.

This highly practical eight-topic program is designed for groups of 8-20 people over 2 days.

Topics covered by participants are:

  1. Safety is personal – Understanding why safety is important to you.
  2. Safety in the workplace – When do you feel safe at work? Why?
  3. Why do people behave the way they do? The psychology of human behaviour and human factors
  4. Changing safety behaviour – Communication and consultation
  5. What makes a good safety culture – The Hudson maturity model
  6. Strengthening the culture – Identifying and managing risk
  7. Strengthening the culture – Setting standards
  8. Embedding new beliefs, attitudes and behaviours – The next steps

Need to engage hearts and minds of your people?

Call us to talk about how we can customise this program to specific needs of your organisation.

Phone 1300 453 555, internationally on +613 9510 0477 or click below.

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How to nail your goals

How to nail your goals

Are you left with a bundle of New Year’s resolutions which sounded like a good idea at the time, but never made it past the idea stage? Here are six hacks to revive those goals. 1. Know what you want and get SMART about it Goals work best if they have...

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What Do Van Halen & Brown M&M’s Have To Do With Safety?

What Do Van Halen & Brown M&M’s Have To Do With Safety?

Van Halen’s Brown M&Ms –
Their Key To Rock and Roll Safety

There’s a long tradition of musicians and actors adding in absurd demands in their performance contracts just because they could.

Van Halen, the American hair rock band of the 80’s were infamous for this inclusion in their contract, Article 126, “There will be no brown M&M’s in the backstage area, upon pain of forfeiture of the show, with full compensation.”

For years this clause was seen as a frivolous and ego-maniacal expression of the rock and roll lifestyle.

In his book, Crazy From the Heat, original front man David Lee Roth explains that the request was actually a quick safety assessment. With tonnes of stage equipment, high powered electronics, pyrotechnics and large crowds, the humble brown M&M was a warning signal to see if the stagehands had been paying attention to each detail of the written contract to ensure the safety of the band, crew and audience.

Watch the David Lee Roth speaking about the Van Halen Brown M&M clause:

Lee Roth writes:
“Van Halen was the first band to take huge productions into tertiary, third-level markets. We’d pull up with nine eighteen-wheeler trucks, full of gear, where the standard was three trucks, max. And there were many, many technical errors, whether it was the girders couldn’t support the weight, or the flooring would sink in, or the doors weren’t big enough to move the gear through. The contract rider read like a version of the Chinese Yellow Pages because there was so much equipment, and so many human beings to make it function.

mm1So just as a little test, in the technical aspect of the rider, it would say ‘Article 148: There will be fifteen amperage voltage sockets at twenty-foot spaces, evenly, providing nineteen amperes…’ And article number 126, in the middle of nowhere, was: ‘There will be no brown M&M’s in the backstage area, upon pain of forfeiture of the show, with full compensation.’

So I would walk backstage, if I saw brown M&M’s in that bowl…..well, line-check the entire production. Guaranteed you’re going to arrive at a technical error. They didn’t read the contract. Guaranteed you’d run into a problem. Sometimes it would threaten to just destroy the whole show. Something like, literally, life-threatening”

Dan and Chip Heath’s book, Decisive, How to make better decisions in life and work they summarise that “David Lee Roth was no diva; he was an operations master. In Van Halen’s world, a brown M&M was a tripwire.”

Image Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/clender/7239011350/

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Working well: An organisational approach to preventing psychological injury

Working well: An organisational approach to preventing psychological injury

Download Now:

Comcare Publication
Working Well:
An Organisational Approach To Preventing Psychological Injury

A GUIDE FOR CORPORATE, HR AND OHS MANAGERS

Source: Comcare.

Many employees will at times feel that they are not coping well at work for a variety of reasons.
Some of these employees will experience some degree of stress as a result. While many people have strategies to deal with these situations, work-related stress becomes a concern where it is intense or sustained for such a time that it causes ill-health, psychological injury and workers’ compensation claims. Where significant numbers of employees experience the effects of stress at work, the problem can assume organisational proportions. Stress that has such harmful effects is now being recognised as a major workplace issue with significant costs for organisations, individuals and their families.

The factors that contribute to a psychological injury are many, and different prevention strategies may be required, depending on the factors prevailing in the particular organisation, workplace or work team. This publication from Comcare provides information to assist Australian government organisations to design and implement strategies to manage work-related stress and prevent psychological injury.  It provides information on the major causes of stress and psychological injury. It also covers evidence-based interventions for minimising the adverse impact of these factors, as indicated by international and Australian research and analysis of Comcare claims data.

Comcare recommends that agencies adopt a systematic and structured approach to occupational health and safety (OHS) risk management.

A four step process to risk management is recommended, involving:

1.Identifying the sources of potential harm to employee health and wellbeing.

2. Systematically assessing the risk of employees being harmed.

3.Developing and implementing a plan to:
a) address the workplace factors that are risks of psychological injury (primary intervention);
b) minimise the impact of stress on employees (secondary intervention);
c) provide safe and effective rehabilitation and return to work for individuals once an injury has occurred (tertiary intervention); and

4. Monitoring and reviewing the implementation and effectiveness of interventions against agreed performance indicators and targets to ensure continuous improvement.

Source:  Comcare https://www.comcare.gov.au/

Download Now:

Comcare Publication
Working Well:
An Organisational Approach To Preventing Psychological Injury

A GUIDE FOR CORPORATE, HR AND OHS MANAGERS